Yamaha Outdoors Tip of the Week - Four Wheels, Five Ways, This Summer

Build that pit blind now for later.

By Steve Hickoff

If you’re like me, the post-turkey lull has gripped you in a mild depression. You’re trying to find ways to bridge the months to the fall hunting seasons. Here are five remedies for the ‘tweener blues:

Small Game: Check your hunting regulations as opportunities for such wild game as squirrels and woodchucks are likely available sometime soon—if not now. You can ride along likely habitats, park your rig on game trails, then sneak in by foot to take wooded bushytails or pasture-feeding groundhogs.

Farmers will appreciate the latter effort and possibly even grant big-game access later on.

Blind Building: Early waterfowl seasons are just on the other side of the barbecue months. Plan, dig and build pit and other blinds. Carry tools and materials to the location using your Yamaha ATV or Side-by-Side. Anticipation is part of the pre-season planning fun. Check out this advice from Ducks Unlimited toward building your own duck blind:

http://www.ducks.org/hunting/hunting-tips/build-a-better-blind

Scout New Land: If laws and regulations permit access with your four-wheeled vehicle, check out new hunting locations now. Study maps and plot destinations to add new options to your longtime list of spots.

As with blind building, it’ll keep you thinking in the direction of fall.

Game Check: How’s the hatch in your area? Wild turkeys and waterfowl are raising broods now. Getting outdoors can offer a nice alternative to simply hunting both. It gives you a good idea of how your favored species are faring locally. As early goose seasons for resident birds go, it will definitely give you a head start with scouting. The same holds true for seeing deer in your area: bucks, does and fawns.

Check that local wild game’s pulse.

Remember the Landowner: The same good people who offer you access to their land for hunting might also appreciate the assistance you can share with your four Yamaha wheels. Offer to do some of the farm work with them. If they decline with thanks, ask twice. Show your gratitude.

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